UPDATE: Mandatory Water Restrictions Imposed by East Bay MUD

August 13, 2014 · 29 comments

The East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) on Tuesday imposed mandatory restrictions on water use to help alleviate California’s drought.

California is facing one of the worst droughts on record, and Gov. Jerry Brown has asked all Californians to reduce water usage by 20 percent and the state has already imposed mandatory restrictions on outdoor water use.

EBMUD’s board today unanimously prohibited using potable water for decorative ponds or fountains, washing cars or boats with a hose without a shutoff nozzle, washing sidewalks or driveways with potable water, irrigating lawns or gardens with potable water more than two days a week and flushing sewers or hydrants with potable water.

While the restrictions are mandatory, the agency isn’t anticipating having to take punitive steps to enforce it, EBMUD spokeswoman Nelsy Rodriguez said.

She said while the district retains the right to install flow-controlling devices and charge fines to customers using too much water, it will instead get customers on board with the restrictions by beefing up public outreach.

“Education works well here,” Rodriguez said. Education has worked well already, she said, as East Bay water customers have voluntarily reduced their water consumption by 10.7 percent since the district asked for a 10 percent reduction in February.

The new mandatory restrictions are intended to get even more people thinking about conserving water and taking steps to do so in their home, she said.

To help, EBMUD is also offering rebate programs for water-saving devices like lawn controllers that put limits on irrigation systems to help customers use less water, Rodriguez said.

1 Anyone, anyone at all August 13, 2014 at 5:04 PM

thinking about building desalinization plants? Better ways to store water for future use? Better ways to use the water we have without punishing the people?

Cut benefits for illegals, then there will be plenty of money. And if by chance that is not enough, cut welfare benefits and get those people who can work back to work and off the public dime.

2 Dennis August 13, 2014 at 5:26 PM

and they want us to save a pint here and there, while they are dumping BILLIONS of gallons per month into the ocean, and closing dams/reservoirs all over California?
In the last 10 years, CA has passed $10B in intitiatives to improve our water storage, but nothing has been done. Yet they want to put yet another one on the November ballot, for another $11B, with the same excuse.

simply outrageous abuse of authority, and manipulation of our resources, for political purposes. Who are the people sitting on these boards, and how do we get them fired/recalled?

Dam Removal:
http://www.water.ca.gov/fishpassage/docs/dams/dam_removal_5_09.pdf

California Drains Reservoirs in the Middle of a Drought:
http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304547704579565622649474370

3 Dwight Schrute August 13, 2014 at 5:29 PM

Broken system…water should be allocated to customers on a per person basis…

4 TinFoiler August 13, 2014 at 5:31 PM

So I guess it’s no problem using bottled water for that decorative fountain?:)
How in the World do the Arabs do it with all that desert? Oh that’s right – They’re so bass ackwards over there that they are using desalinisation. For those saying that it takes too much energy to be worth it = GET A BLOOM BOX!!!
http://www.bloomenergy.com/
It’s good enough for Google, AT&T and Walmart, but not for Water treatment?
It’s time to get with the times.

5 Atticus Thraxx August 13, 2014 at 5:34 PM

Solar and wind powered desalination plants instead of faux high-speed rail ought to be where we’re heading.
‘Cept our governor seems obsessed about choo-choo trains.
We have already kind of imposed those restrictions here at the compound. Water ain’t cheap. And if the drought continues into next summer we may have to drain the pool and that would suck epically.

6 I'm The Urban Spaceman August 13, 2014 at 5:53 PM

¿How much will EBMUD raise their rates to compensate for the lost revenue(millions of dollars) due to water conservation?

7 Politically Incorrect August 13, 2014 at 5:53 PM

How much water is consumed by illegals? Round ‘em up and deport!

8 SKS August 13, 2014 at 6:12 PM

Congratulations!

EBMUD customers will do such a good job at water conservation that the EBMUD board will have to raise rates in order to raise revenue (to keep up with their pension costs).

9 Jar Head August 13, 2014 at 6:14 PM

Well water 4 sale .50 per gallon. Get those plants watered now you know how much it will cost to replace them. Bring containers , or truck loads.

10 anarchist August 13, 2014 at 6:20 PM

which water company services claycord?

11 bluebird August 13, 2014 at 6:38 PM

Restrictions in water use are mandatory but they aren’t going to enforce it? Can’t wait until they knock on my door wanting to see if I am waiting to flush the toilet until the water is brown.

12 KJ August 13, 2014 at 6:51 PM

Conservation is cheaper and easier than building desalinization plants or reservoirs; plus, it takes time to build things, while it takes no time to turn off the tap. But, if you want your taxes raised so you can water your lawn, by all means, keep yammering for desalinization plants.

13 Well water for sale August 13, 2014 at 7:03 PM

$1.00 a gallon, $1.50 if you want a smile.

Cash only.

14 Kirk August 13, 2014 at 7:23 PM

I think the other problem with desalinization is the high concentration of salts it creates in it’s waste waster. Fish and other marine life can only live in certain parameters of salinity. Wherever you put the plant you also create a spreading Dead Sea. Not a deal breaker for the Saudis but they had no choice.

My personal choice is grass. Why do humans have a desperate need to grow grass? When they live in a near desert. There just isn’t enough water for 1950s idealism.

How much of the average water bill is used to grow grass that we pay someone to mow? I know it looks nice but I think getting rid of natural grass lawns beats a billion dollar facility permanently supported by tax payers and dead fish.

Probably help the air with no more gas mowers too.

15 rob August 13, 2014 at 7:32 PM

GOT MILK?

16 Anon August 13, 2014 at 7:40 PM

And still more new homes continue to go up, the lie continues on.

17 RBZ August 13, 2014 at 8:23 PM

anarchist, Contra Costa Water District (CCWD) services Claycord. They’re still under voluntary restrictions. EBMUD services Pleasant Hill, Walnut Creek, Lamorinda area, San Ramon and cities east of Claycord. Here’s a link to their map:
https://www.ebmud.com/about/service-area-map
Here’s a link to CCWD’s:
http://www.ccwater.com/welcome/servicemap.asp

18 Anon August 13, 2014 at 8:46 PM

#14, Not a deal breaker – they can let the waste water evaporate in collection pond and then they’ll have salt to sell.
Taxes will go up regardless. If we were talking about Oil, No Questions would be asked about building pipelines etc.
What a shame that All of that water goes right back out to the river when it rains.
There’s a containment problem more than a rain problem.

19 MadMom August 13, 2014 at 10:19 PM

If hate equaled knowledge, this thread could solve problems instead of just pointing out all the ignorance in Claycord’s midst.

20 Vandy August 14, 2014 at 7:13 AM

I agree with Madmom. And I would also add that this issue is a particularly touchy one because of the feelings of entitlement that people have over water. It immediately induces comparisons of behavior between different people, our different belief systems, politics, and the value of water for various purposes. Add on to that the hope and possibility that heavy rains may come, rendering the entire discussion moot for decades. And that makes for a toxic mix of futile human drama. One thing I know for sure is that it can’t hurt to let the lawn go brown now and go green again later. It is a sacrifice no matter how insignificant or critical it may actually be.

21 Silva August 14, 2014 at 8:48 AM

Lawns all went completly brown last major drought, came back to verdant green with the rains.

22 anarchist August 14, 2014 at 9:37 AM

thanks RBZ no. 17. i live in an apartment so I had no idea who the servicer was.

23 tired of taxes August 14, 2014 at 9:46 AM

Just ban grass for lawns and golf courses. We can still have greenery with less water with shrubs and small bushes.
Banning certain species of plant life is not new for California. There are several species of trees that can’t be imported into California from abroad or other states.
But then again, the right hand often times does not know what the left hand is doing; government agencies have a reputation for not working with each other.

24 tired of taxes August 14, 2014 at 9:49 AM

Oh and +1 again for Dwight Schrute. Water allocations per person, not historical usage for a specific address.
And a corporation legally considered as a person should also just count as 1 person for water allocation.
Can’t go Animal Farm on us with “some animals are more equal than others”, right?

25 Incognito August 14, 2014 at 10:39 AM

Every morning The Weather Channel has a segment covering the severe drought California.

I’m still seeing thriving greens at all golf courses in the area as well as real estate listings in certain cities in Contra Costa County where the homes and lawns are large and very green.

So, who exactly is supposed to be the ones cutting back?

26 skrab August 14, 2014 at 11:45 AM

I got rid of my lawn a few years ago and put in drought tolerant plants that I water for 15 minutes twice a week using a drip irrigation system. I do not flush for number one when at home. I get wet in the shower, turn off the water, lather up, turn on the water, and then rinse.

I suspect that the people who don’t take measures to reduce their use of water are the same people who drive gas guzzlers and complain about the price of grass.

27 Pink Undies August 14, 2014 at 11:55 AM

Hmm… Well I already reduced my lawn watering from three days to two days. That wasn’t helpful to the lawn, so I just went back to 3 days and reduced the watering time by a third. Hoping that will help.

28 mikeyV August 14, 2014 at 3:17 PM

Here’s a few things I do to save water, y’all come along now…

-Take Navy Showers. Easy to do in summer, just shut off the water while lathering. Turn back on to rinse.
-I’m at home for 3 months watching the baby…I bathe every 1.5 days!
-I dont flush the toilet unless I’ve pissed in in at least twice, preferably 3 times during beer drinking hours.
-F’ the lawn! It’s dead.
-Of course, turn off the faucet when shaving, vbrushing teeth, washing dishes.

You’d be amazed how much can be saved.

29 TinFoiler August 15, 2014 at 2:40 PM

LOL, You’re fair game for a FINE$, meanwhile the corporate bottom feeders do whatever the f they want
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/why-bottled-water-comes-california-200816657.html

Comments on this entry are closed.

Previous post:

Next post: