East Bay MUD to Consider Mandatory Water Use Restrictions

August 12, 2014 12:05 pm · 22 comments

The East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) will consider mandatory restrictions to water use at its meeting this afternoon.

Restrictions by EBMUD would prohibit using potable water for decorative ponds or fountains, washing cars or boats with a hose without a shutoff nozzle, washing sidewalks or driveways with potable water, irrigating lawns or gardens with potable water more than two days a week and flushing sewers or hydrants with potable water.

Penalties for violations of the restrictions could include excessive use charges and the installation of flow control devices.

1 WC August 12, 2014 at 12:48 PM

Watering the lawn two days a week? Will it survive?

2 funny man August 12, 2014 at 1:04 PM

does any one know if it legal to water your lawn with grey water in tjhis county?

3 Durwood August 12, 2014 at 1:37 PM

As someone who has a well that is used for all landscape irrigation and things like hosing off the driveway, etc., how do I avoid fines and/or other penalties due to people reporting me for watering my lawn regularly?

4 CW August 12, 2014 at 1:49 PM

Guess it’s time to bite the bullet and look into replacing our lawn. It’s already looking brownish since we cut down to every-other-day watering to try to conserve water.

5 iluvfriedchicken August 12, 2014 at 1:58 PM

How will the agency monitor how often I water my garden. I only water it twice a week anyway, but what are they going to do?

6 SKS August 12, 2014 at 2:35 PM

EBMUD customers did such a good job at conservation that EBMUD raised their rates. Congratulations!

Now here comes the hammer….

What will happen is pit neighbor against neighbor rattng each other out. The manhours on administrative citations will rise exponentially.

Btw, there is a big water pipe over in Orinda or Moraga that has been leaking for years and years and EBMUD won’t repair it because it would be “disruptive”.

7 Owl Lady August 12, 2014 at 3:14 PM

It is very hard for me to reduce our water use more than we have. Over the past 3 years, we took out a large piece of our lawn, bought a water-saving washer, built up the garden with drought-tolerant plants, and reconfigured our landscape watering to all drip except for the remaining lawn. When I see green lawns on golf courses, beautiful landscaping around commercial buildings and water wasted by the cities and counties when they don’t fix leaks, I feel like I have done my part and don’t want to do more until there is a more equitable solution.

8 Concord Mike August 12, 2014 at 3:46 PM

Just a reminder – most Claycord readers get their water from CCWD, not EBMUD.

CCWD has NOT yet imposed such restrictions, and they really don’t need to due to the fact that we have a near-full reservoir (Los Vaqueros) servicing the Concord area.

If you do decide to voluntarily cut back irrigation to two days a week, just make sure the sprinklers run for 20 minutes or more so enough water soaks down to the roots. Your lawns should survive with that amount from what I have read.

Most automated sprinkler systems today offer the ability to run two cycles per day. If you get runoff with one continuous 30 minute watering, try 2 cycles at 15 minutes each. That gives the water time to soak in so it doesn’t runoff and put you at odds with the state mandate not to waste water.

9 water August 12, 2014 at 4:49 PM

trees & shrubs, let the lawns die. I had so many weeds in my lawn, the grass died first but the weeds are still green. Gah!

10 Tom August 12, 2014 at 5:22 PM

I prefer voluntary restrictions, but mandatory restrictions including fines will wake people up. You can’t live if they shut your water off.

11 Teacher Wannabe August 12, 2014 at 5:30 PM

Stop wasting water on golf courses! End of rant, for now.

12 Many of us in Claycord August 12, 2014 at 5:50 PM

get our water from the Contra Costa Water District.

From what I have observed, CCWD has done a lot more to insure its customers an adequate supply of potable water than many other districts.

We all need to conserve, CCWD makes it a little easier with their superiour planning.

Now, who is going to take the next step and start building a non potable water system and then a desalinization plant? We need to plan and build now for th future.

13 Anon August 12, 2014 at 6:54 PM

And yet the state/county continue to build new homes. What kind of math are these idiots using? Greed math, i.e. we’ll raise rates and penalize folks after we exceed supply. Time to end these lying and corrupt politicians careers.

14 Burnin August 12, 2014 at 8:02 PM

To many people, not enough water and more are on their way.

15 joe August 12, 2014 at 11:53 PM

WHEN THE DELTA DRIES UP ! THEN YOU HAVE TO WOOORRRYYY.

16 It's for the money August 13, 2014 at 12:29 AM

The EBMUD cracks me up. Great water, lousy politics. We have already conserved 9% or 10%. However..

Watering twice a week? How long? My neighbor’s sprinklers run for hours…mine run 8 minutes per zone.
How about those green lawns in Alamo, Danville, and Blackhawk? Those folks..you never see a brown lawn out there.
And..who’s to stop my neighbor who constantly has to top off their SWIMMING POOL?
And they don’t have a restriction? Their pool water (sans chlorine) would water my garden all season.
And the family up the street with 5 kids, all teenagers? Bet they use more water than a little old pensioner and his wife with one cat.
Yes, you cut back, and the next ration is a further cut. Those water wasters get cut back but they were over the top, so now, so they are where you used to be. You get penalized for saving water.
It’s all about the money. You conserve and the flow of revenue drops, so they raise rates, scream drought and now neighbors point out and snitch on you!
Last I looked, San Pablo Res. was FULL. Far cry from the 1970’s drought.

17 Roz August 13, 2014 at 7:52 AM

@#3Durwwod,…
Make a small sign on a wood plaque “Well Water” and stake it in your front Yard. I use well water too!

18 Unfair to residents August 13, 2014 at 7:57 AM

Residents up water usage is a fraction of commercial and farming use and yet we are the ones who are demonized and who pay for it. No body ever talks about that.
I do not want to be policing my neighbors or the other way around.

19 Laurie August 13, 2014 at 8:08 AM

@It’s for the money, clearly you don’t have a pool. You have to keep the water level up in order to run the filter and prevent it from becoming a green mosquito infested swamp. I hate that the water evaporates so quickly, you think I enjoy turning the faucet on to fill it? I don’t!!! A dry pool leads to a cracking pool which costs around 10,000.00 to resurface. My lawns are brown (which I hate), I have stopped using my fountain, my plants that aren’t drought resistant are dying, I don’t wash my car at home, I sweep my sidewalks, and I gave away my indoor plants just so I can maintain my pool. Maybe the family up the street from you should give their kids up for adoption since they need to use more water than you. There IS a water shortage, everyone needs to do their part to conserve but I’m not the water police. I choose to worry about ME doing MY part and hope that others will do the same.

20 Many people should August 13, 2014 at 8:50 AM

take the time to learn how water cycles through this world.

There is plenty of water, potable water.

The greater problem is governments water management.

It is said that if the government were to manage the sand in the Sahara, the Sahara would soon run out of sand.

The government manages our water, we are now running out of drinkable water. “Punish the people” is their motto.

Next the government wants to regulate aquifers. What’s next, ocean water?

The government is the greatest problem.

21 @#13 and #20 August 13, 2014 at 9:30 AM

Both correct.

“One of the paradoxes of our age is the fact that the intellectuals, the politicians, and all the sundry voices that choke like asthma the throat of our communications media, have never gasped and stuttered so loudly about their devotion to the public good, and about the people’s will as the supreme criterion of value – and never have they been so grossly indifferent to the people. The reason, obviously, is that collectivist slogans serve as the rationalization for those who intend, not to follow the people, but to rule them.”

22 Aspirin August 13, 2014 at 5:30 PM

Too many people are complaining about water restrictions. Get a clue, folks, we are in a DROUGHT !

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